IFS 2023 webinars

Connecting research and practice

Varied topics

Rigorous detail

Realtime Q&A

Recordings available

2023 IFS webinar series

A programme of webinars covering a variety of topics relating to fertiliser production and crop nutrition

During 2023 the IFS will continue to organise webinars for those involved and interested in the production and application of fertilising products. These webinars will be in the same format as in previous years.

Society Members will be able to attend all these webinars without charge, as well as having free access to the presentation charts, a recording of the webinar, and a pdf copy of the written paper, where applicable. For UK attendees, each webinar will be worth BASIS FACTS CPD points.

Non-members are also welcome to attend, for a charge of £15 per webinar, or £25 for a webinar plus access to a pdf of the presentation charts, recording of the webinar and pdf of written papers, where applicable. Selected webinars will be free to all.

For those who are unfamiliar with the quality of Society talks, we are offering a ‘taster’, to enable non-members to attend one webinar (only, excluding recordings and pdfs) for free. To take advantage of this offer, enter the code IFSFREEWEB into the Coupon box in your basket when registering for a webinar.

Detailed information on the webinars that comprise this programme is shown below. Updates will be added as these are finalised. Webinar registration will open for each webinar as its details are confirmed, and will be accessed from the section for each webinar, below.

A new definition of ‘Plant Nutrient’ and its implications for fertilizer regulations globally

Patrick Brown, University of California, Davis, and Achim Dobermann, Chief Scientist, International Fertiliser Association

Problems with current fertiliser nomenclature

Hans Lambers, The University of Western Australia

Wednesday 25 January 2023

How fertiliser application and specific genetic variants combine to impact on the acrylamide forming potential of wheat

Joe Oddy, Rothamsted Research

The effects of the application of Zn-enriched fertilizer in improving the grain nutritional quality of maize

Lester Botoman, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Management of multispecies swards with reduced N compared to high N grass monocultures

Shona Baker, University College Dublin, Ireland

Wednesday 22 February 2023

Exploring the language of crop nutrition

Wednesday 25 January 2023
16.00 GMT / 17.00 CET

A new definition of ‘Plant Nutrient’ and its implications for fertilizer regulations globally

Prof Patrick Brown, University of California Davis, USA and Achim Dobermann, Chief Scientist, International Fertilizer Association, France

Patrick Brown is one of the main developers of the New Paradigm for Plant Nutrition, which was explained to us by Achim Dobermann, Chief Scientist of the International Fertilizer Association, in October 2021. Achim focused on the program for change that the IFA is aiming to drive through the industry, that has the new definition of a plant nutrient at its core. This presentation augmented this by looking in more detail at the scientific considerations that have led to the need for a new definition, and the practical benefits that this will provide to the industry. 

The scientific case for replacing the terms P2O5, K2O, CaO in fertilizer nomenclature with % P, K Ca

Prof Hans Lambers, The University of Western Australia

This presentation explained the questionable scientific basis of these widely used abbreviations, along with an alternative approach that is more robustly based on scientific understanding.

 

BASIS FACTS CPD PN points for this webinar have been applied for

the research projects that won the 2022 brian chambers award

Wednesday 22 February 2023
13.00 GMT / 14.00 CET

How fertiliser application and specific genetic variants combine to impact on the acrylamide forming potential of wheat

Joe Oddy, Rothamsted Research, UK

This research looked at how fertiliser application and specific genetic variants combine to impact on the potentially harmful acrylamide forming potential of soft wheat. Adding sulphur fertiliser helps to reduce grain asparagine content (which is the key precursor to acrylamide). This research indicated that a N : S application rate of 10 to 1 (kg/ha) was sufficient to prevent large increases in asparagine.  

The effects of the application of Zn-enriched fertilizer in improving the grain nutritional quality of maize

Lester Botoman, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources (LUANAR), Malawi

This research sought to establish the quantitative effects of the application of Zn-enriched fertiliser in improving the grain nutritional quality of maize. It found that the use of such fertiliser does increase the Zn content of the maize grains, and that this was to an extent that would have a substantial effect on the dietary intake of people in the area. This work now needs to be extended to cover more of the soil types that occur in Malawi.

Management of multispecies swards with reduced N compared to high N grass monocultures

Shona Baker, University College Dublin, Ireland

The key finding from this research was that a rotationally grazed  multi-species sward (containing six species) produced more grass over a two year period than did a perennial ryegrass monoculture, whilst receiving half of much nitrogenous fertiliser. A key research need now is to investigate how to best manage such multi-species swards over a longer time period.

BASIS FACTS CPD PN points for this webinar will be applied for.